North-South migration, part 4: After 2011, the stream dries out again?

Mix of increased security, propaganda campaigns appear successful in sharply cutting defections
February 19th, 2014
2

The division of Korea also brought about the phenomenon of illegal migration from the North to the South (as well as in the opposite direction). The nature of this migration has changed throughout the 70 years of division, and it seems that in the past 2-3 years we have witnessed another change. This four-part mini

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About the Author

Andrei Lankov

Andrei Nikolaevich Lankov is a Russian scholar of Asia and a specialist in Korean studies. He completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at Leningrad State University in 1986 and 1989, respectively; He also attended Pyongyang's Kim Il-sung University in 1985. Following his graduate studies, he taught Korean history and language at his alma mater, and in 1992 went to South Korea for work; he moved to Australia in 1996 to take up a post at the Australian National University, and moved back to Seoul to teach at Kookmin University in 2004. Dr. Lankov has a DPRK-themed Livejournal blog in Russian with occasional English posts, where he documents aspects of life in North (and South) Korea, together with his musings and links to his publications. He also writes columns for the English-language daily The Korea Times.

Join the discussion

  • Xavier

    Interesting article, Prof. Lankov.

    I’m really surprised, and quite perplexed, by the DPRK’s government to issue passports to individuals to go to China. Given the importance of limiting their contact with the outside world, I don’t understand why the regime would allow that.

    Surely, they must only allow individuals that are part of the elite, or the core group, right? Surely, they wouldn’t allow, say, a farmer, to just to China for a private visit?

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