Putin and Pyongyang in 2012

January 10th, 2012
7

When Vladimir Putin became the President of Russia in 1999, he inherited a North Korean foreign policy that was at possibly its most moribund state since the fall of the Soviet Union.  But his arrival heralded a change in North Korean policy, one which became more open to engaging with Pyongyang. These improved relations reflected

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About the Author

Gerard Clare

Gerard Clare is a research student at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, specialising in issues of regionalism and centre-periphery relations in the Russian Far East, including how citizens on the periphery can identify with central representations of what it means to be Russian, and in what ways these representations may conflict with regional identities. His knowledge extends through to Russia-DPRK relations in the post-Soviet era, with particular focus on engagement, expectations and wider themes around energy and security. He has previously completed both his undergraduate degree in Central and East European Studies in 2011, and his MSc in Russian, Central and East European studies in 2012, at the University of Glasgow. He has contributed a number of articles to NKNews since 2011, looking at Russia-DPRK relations, Six-Party Talks and even football within the DPRK.

Join the discussion

  • Guest

    Very good work. I’d be interested to read your thoughts on the upcoming DPRK foreign policy review. The mainstream in the west seem curious as to whether new leadership will constitute a less hardline regime.

    That said, my favourite Kim Jong-il story was how he had lobster airlifted to his train when visiting Russia. Daily. It just edges out his world record breaking round of golf, or the spectacular double rainbow which heralded his birth.

  • Guest

    Very good work. I’d be interested to read your thoughts on the upcoming DPRK foreign policy review. The mainstream in the west seem curious as to whether new leadership will constitute a less hardline regime.

    That said, my favourite Kim Jong-il story was how he had lobster airlifted to his train when visiting Russia. Daily. It just edges out his world record breaking round of golf, or the spectacular double rainbow which heralded his birth.

  • http://twitter.com/stakhanovite Gerard Clare

    Thanks for reading,

    I don’t think 2012 will be the best time to judge whether the regime will be any more or less hardline than before. It’s highly symbolic for North Korea as it’s the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kim-Il Sung, and a time when the people had been promised it would be a time of plenty. 2013 and beyond will really be the time to start watching to see how the regime behaves. My own estimate is that while there may be economic developments, moreso on a national level than on the streets, little will change politically or with internal security.

    Glad you enjoyed.

  • http://twitter.com/stakhanovite Gerard Clare

    Thanks for reading,

    I don’t think 2012 will be the best time to judge whether the regime will be any more or less hardline than before. It’s highly symbolic for North Korea as it’s the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kim-Il Sung, and a time when the people had been promised it would be a time of plenty. 2013 and beyond will really be the time to start watching to see how the regime behaves. My own estimate is that while there may be economic developments, moreso on a national level than on the streets, little will change politically or with internal security.

    Glad you enjoyed.

  • N/R/

    Georaphy dictates…100% agree with the author. Thank you for the work. Taking a look at the Russia-DPRK relationships one should consider China as well. Hope to read the next work on the theme through the prizma of China’s interests.
    Guest from Russia.

  • N/R/

    Georaphy dictates…100% agree with the author. Thank you for the work. Taking a look at the Russia-DPRK relationships one should consider China as well. Hope to read the next work on the theme through the prizma of China’s interests.
    Guest from Russia.

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