How I was introduced to capitalism – the North Korean way

Three currencies in 1980s North Korea allowed foreigners to spend money in sometimes surprising ways
April 8th, 2014
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After living in North Korea for 15 years, adapting to capitalism when I first arrived in the West was difficult. I simply wasn’t used to looking after myself or managing my own budget. It’s difficult going from living in a communist country – where the state looks after almost every aspect of your life –

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About the Author

Monique Macias

Monique was born in Equatorial Guinea and grew up in Pyongyang, North Korea. She graduated at the University of Light Industry, with a BA as a Textile Engineer. Since leaving North Korea, Macias has been working as a fashion designer in countries including Spain, South Korea, and the U.S. Macias recently wrote a book about her life in North Korea which will soon be translated in to English.


Join the discussion

  • Andres

    A very interesting point of view, it shows how life was different for the well-educated north koreans.