Why North Koreans Should Be Allowed Asylum Beyond South Korea

Economic and social discrimination in South Korea provides a rationale for asylum in third countries
March 25th, 2013
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North Korean re-migrants are in a precarious position, sometimes offered asylum, other times deported as illegal immigrants. Until now, it has been taken for granted that because a majority of these individuals leaving South Korea are, or were, carrying South Korean passports, they are in no position to seek refuge elsewhere. Putting precedent aside for

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About the Author

Markus Bell

Markus Bell  has lived in South Korea for six years, during which time he completed a masters in anthropology at Seoul National University, focusing on the lives of North Korean refugees in South Korea. He is currently a PhD candidate in the anthropology department atThe Australian National University, where he continues to move back and forth between Australia, China and Korea, carrying out research on transnationalism, identity, gender and nationalism as these concepts relate to North Koreans in China and South Korea.

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