North Korean Refugees and the Challenges of Failed Assimilation

September 2nd, 2012
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“The past always follows me, I will always be a North Korean, I will always be on the outside, and this is how I feel, like I am able to do things like interviews and documentaries, but I feel that it is hard to be on the inside, I feel that people and companies worry

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About the Author

Markus Bell

Markus Bell  has lived in South Korea for six years, during which time he completed a masters in anthropology at Seoul National University, focusing on the lives of North Korean refugees in South Korea. He is currently a PhD candidate in the anthropology department atThe Australian National University, where he continues to move back and forth between Australia, China and Korea, carrying out research on transnationalism, identity, gender and nationalism as these concepts relate to North Koreans in China and South Korea.

Join the discussion

  • Pete

    Great read :D

  • Chris

    Another interesting article. I would suggest that migrants who manage to assimilate are not as common as one might expect. It is not surprising that some do not want to change – to change completely is to deny one’s roots – and no matter how hard those may have been they are still roots.

  • Anthony

    The DPRK intrigues me. Tho’ not Korean, I would respect the situation people from the north are facing. How about trying more sincerity, more love of our fellow man/woman.