Media Lens: Good Rockets, Bad Rockets

May 16th, 2012
6

An interesting article on North Korea surfaced today at MediaLens.org, a British website that “describ[es] how mainstream newspapers and broadcasters operate as a propaganda system for the elite interests that dominate modern society.”  The article in question took issue with the BBC for their “biased” coverage of North Korea’s failed “rocket” launch compared with

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About the Author

Chad O'Carroll

Chad O'Carroll founded NK News in 2010. He is based in Washington, D.C.

Join the discussion

  • David Ferris

    I share the view expressed by the Media Lens article, that the BBC’s coverage is biased and unbalanced.

  • David Ferris

    I share the view expressed by the Media Lens article, that the BBC’s coverage is biased and unbalanced.

  • http://guseonguk.wordpress.com John 성욱

    Prior to and immediately following the DPRK’s attempted satellite launch, I repeatedly pointed out to friends and coworkers the fact that the US and ROK governments, among others, as well as most media, consistently make up their minds beforehand that every North Korean action is provocative and wrong, no matter how similar it may be to actions those countries carry out themselves. South Korea has attempted multiple space launches (all of which failed) and recently updated an agreement it has maintained with the US regarding missile ranges so that they may extend the range of their own missiles to go well beyond North Korea. North Korea correctly cleared the launch through international agencies and invited observers from nations including the US to view the launch, but the US actually barred its officials from attending and even discouraged journalists from doing so. The US actual went out of its way to be negatively subjective and tried to stifle potential objectivity on the subject. North Korea was using this launch as a test to see whether the US was even capable of being fair and reasonable with North Korea and whether or not the world will really allow North Korea to be a part of the international community as so many claim it fails to do. The “reaction” (most of which was decided before the launch even occurred) in this case proved that North Korea is never going to be given the same chances as other countries.

    • http://www.facebook.com/chadocarroll Chad OC

      Fair point but don’t forget the UN Resolutions all said DPRK should not have launched anything, even satellite launch vehicles.  Admittedly that does go against grain of outer space treaty, though…

  • http://guseonguk.wordpress.com John 성욱

    Prior to and immediately following the DPRK’s attempted satellite launch, I repeatedly pointed out to friends and coworkers the fact that the US and ROK governments, among others, as well as most media, consistently make up their minds beforehand that every North Korean action is provocative and wrong, no matter how similar it may be to actions those countries carry out themselves. South Korea has attempted multiple space launches (all of which failed) and recently updated an agreement it has maintained with the US regarding missile ranges so that they may extend the range of their own missiles to go well beyond North Korea. North Korea correctly cleared the launch through international agencies and invited observers from nations including the US to view the launch, but the US actually barred its officials from attending and even discouraged journalists from doing so. The US actual went out of its way to be negatively subjective and tried to stifle potential objectivity on the subject. North Korea was using this launch as a test to see whether the US was even capable of being fair and reasonable with North Korea and whether or not the world will really allow North Korea to be a part of the international community as so many claim it fails to do. The “reaction” (most of which was decided before the launch even occurred) in this case proved that North Korea is never going to be given the same chances as other countries.

    • http://www.facebook.com/chadocarroll Chad OC

      Fair point but don’t forget the UN Resolutions all said DPRK should not have launched anything, even satellite launch vehicles.  Admittedly that does go against grain of outer space treaty, though…