A Blogger in Pyongyang (Part 2)

July 15th, 2011
3

In part two of the blogger in Pyongyang mini-series, we present more of Ashen’s university experience.   Having already described his student accommodation in part one, another post reveals greater details about the academic side to Ashen’s life in Pyongyang as a foreign student.

Ashen explains:

“The total duration of study is five years, the first

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About the Author

Chad O'Carroll

Chad O'Carroll founded NK News in 2010. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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  • Kennyv777

    I do not think it is fair to say that being able to walk around unhindered in Pyongyang really gives one insight into the average North Korean life. Pyongyang is the after all the most industrious city in North Korea, with several buildings being there for just the appearance. Only a small portion of the population lives the, the rest being in far less industrious areas. The Kim regime is surely not going to allow the one city that attracts the most foreign students, politicians, and business people to have people eating grass, stray animals, and tree part to ease their hunger pants. In smaller towns, and rural Korea, markets have from time to time been banned, suffering is much more extreme, and there is no motivation for the government to put on a show so foreigners can go home and give a positive image. I think saying that Pyongyang gives good insight into the average life of a North Korea would be like saying that walking around New York, London, or even Seoul gives us a good idea of what the average life in their respective countries is like.